By University of Minnesota Academic Health Center
Researchers have discovered a first-of-its-kind series of compounds possessing anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. The compounds present a new target for potential HIV drug development and future treatment options.
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By Cell Press
Infertility affects up to 15 percent of couples around the world, and in vitro fertilization (IVF) is one way to treat this common condition. A study reveals a safe, accurate, and low-cost method to select genetically normal embryos for the IVF procedure
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By American Friends of Tel Aviv University
A researcher has found that gum-chewing teenagers, and younger children as well, are giving themselves headaches with this habit. These findings could help treat countless cases of migraine and tension headaches in adolescents without the need for additio
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By Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
A new study has found that while three out of four Americans were aware that Angelina Jolie had undergone a preventive double mastectomy, awareness of her story was not associated with an increased understanding of breast cancer risk. The study surveyed m
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By University of California - Los Angeles
Among the most promising advances in the fight against cancer has been the rise of nanomedicine, the application of tiny materials and devices to detect, diagnose and treat disease. Researchers provide one of the most comprehensive assessments to date of
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By European Society of Cardiology (ESC)
Patients with atrial fibrillation – an irregular and often abnormally fast heartbeat – have nearly double the risk of suffering a stroke in the first 30 days after starting to take the anti-clotting drug warfarin compared to non-users,
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By Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum
Physicians have been investigating if established anti-epilepsy drugs have anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory properties – an effect for which these pharmaceutical agents are not usually tested. One of the substances tested caused stronger in
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By University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
African-American women may need to eat fewer or burn more calories than their Caucasian counterparts in order to lose a comparable amount of weight, according to researchers.
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By Saint Louis University
Researchers have found evidence that some chronic sinus issues may be the result of inflammation.
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By Wiley
Scientists have discovered a bacterium that could reduce the use of fertilizer in sugarcane production and improve yield.
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By Aalto University
Sufficient food is available for increasing numbers of people, but at the same time, the dependence of countries on international trade in foodstuffs has increased considerably in 40 years.  The proportion of the population who get enough food (m
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By University of Utah Health Sciences
Cells with a mutation in the gene called K-Ras —- found in close to 30 percent of all cancers, but mostly those with worst prognosis, such as pancreatic cancer, colon cancer, and lung cancer -— subvert the normal mechanisms of cell dea
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By University of Southern California - Health Sciences
Regenerative medicine may offer ways to banish baldness that don't involve toupees. A trio of papers has been published that describes some of the factors that determine when hair grows, when it stops growing and when it falls out.
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By DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Researchers have shown that aerobic glycolysis -- glucose metabolism in the presence of oxygen -- is not the consequence of the cancerous activity of malignant cells, as has been widely believed, but is itself a cancerous event.
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By University of Montreal
As part of an international research project, a team of researchers has developed a DNA clamp that can detect mutations at the DNA level with greater efficiency than methods currently in use. Their work could facilitate rapid screening of those diseases t
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By University of Zurich
Most people are carriers of the Epstein-Barr Virus, which can trigger infectious mononucleosis. Those who become infected as adults are more at risk of becoming ill from it. By contrast, children who become infected are protected by their innate immune sy
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By University of Sunderland
Millions of pounds may be splashed on elite footballers (soccer players) in the English Premier League, but it is those who play in the second and third tier of football who run further on the pitch (field), new research reveals.
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By Jackson Laboratory
Researchers have found a single nucleotide polymorphism difference in cocaine and methamphetamine response between two substrains of the C57BL/6 or "Black 6" inbred laboratory mouse, pointing to Cyfip2 as a regulator of cocaine response with a p
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By American Society for Microbiology
A new antibody could dramatically boost strength and muscle mass in patients with cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sporadic inclusion body myositis, and in elderly patients with sarcopenia, according to research.
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By George Washington University
Forty percent of foreign-educated nurses working in U.S. hospitals and other health care facilities say their wages, benefits or shift assignments are inferior compared to their American colleagues, according to a study published. The findings suggest tha
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